In awe...

reblogs

47,768 notes

flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:


A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.
Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.
Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.
Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.
The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?
Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?
Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source
Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:

A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.

Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.

Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.

Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.

The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?

Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?

Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source

Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

(via labrujamorgan)

980 notes

People With Down Syndrome Disrupt Screening Conference (June 6, 2003)

On May 19th, a group of people with Down’s Syndrome and their supporters disrupted the International Down Syndrome Screening Conference at Regents Collage in London. This is the first time people with Down’s Syndrome have made such a protest and is a major new step in the debate about genetics, eugenics and the rights of disabled people.

As a result of the protest, the conference organisers allowed Anya Souza to speak from the platform. Ms Souza, who is a trustee of the Down Syndrome Association, told the doctors that she opposes Down’s Syndrome screening and that people with Down’s Syndrome are people not medical problems. Her speech was warmly applauded by the conference delegates

The protesters consisted of three people with Down’s Syndrome, another disabled person with learning disabilities and their families and supporters. They had written to the conference organisers in advance and asked to speak, but were refused by the main organiser, Professor Howard Cuckle. It is unacceptable that doctors discuss better ways of preventing people with Down’s Syndrome being born, whilst excluding their voices from the debate. This runs directly counter to one of the main demands of disabled people: ‘Nothing about us without us’.

The protesters expect that their action will persuade the conference organisers to ensure a full debate at next years conference with proper representation of disabled people with learning difficulties. This should be the start of a national debate on prenatal screening.

In her speech, entitled ‘Everything you ever wanted to know about Down’s Syndrome… but never bothered to ask’, Anya Souza said: I can’t get rid of my Down’s Syndrome. But you can’t get rid of my happiness. You can’t get rid of the happiness I give others either. It’s doctors like you that want to test pregnant women and stop people like me being born. You can’t abort me now can you? You can’t kill me…sorry!

Together with my family and friends I have fought to prevent my separation from normal society. I have fought for my rights. I have the right to a job, to services when necessary, to a decent standard of living, to know about my medical problems, to speak my mind, to make choices about my friends, whether to have sex, and so on. To do this you have to be independent when you grow up and not get separated from society… I may have Down’s Syndrome, but I am a person first.

Kitty Gilbert, who also has Down’s Syndrome, said: ….. I enjoyed watching the conference although I was a bit scared of what the conference people were saying. I think screening pregnant mothers with Down’s Syndrome babies is wrong. They are wanting their offspring to be able to enjoy their world around them and have endless happiness. I for one gave my mum pride and joy and I will continue to do so. I think that we should be treated fairly and equally, not being getting rid off because there is so much more in life that we can do. We are what we are and ask our opinion.

LDOnline

I remember when this happened.  Nobody expected that people with Down syndrome could even have an opinion on genetic screening, even though they’re more affected by it than most people.  When they weren’t allowed to speak the regular way, they barged in and made sure people listened.

(via youneedacat)

This was in 2003. The eugenic state only continues to accelerate. This is such an important reminder to work to center the voices of people with Down Syndrome in my work on the rhetoric and ethics of selective abortion.

(via queerandpresentdanger)

(via queerandpresentdanger)

62 notes

In digital spaces, trigger warnings exist in order to facilitate deep discussions about conflict, allowing writers to write very openly about experiences of mental illness, violence, rape, and other topics for both broad and narrow audiences. They are a fairly simple form of metadata that Melanie Yergeau has compared to tagging; perhaps that is why TWs are so common on blogging platforms. They don’t work to allow or encourage readers to avoid specific content–only to know ahead of time what they will be reading. Yergeau has also pointed out that as academics we “tag” our work in lots of ways for both students and colleagues, both in the classroom and out. Trigger warnings ask us to imagine what might be triggering and tag that work accordingly, and not in order for those works to be avoided.

Responding to “On Trigger Warnings and the Halberstam Affair: a Panel Discussion” | Neil F. Simpkins

Trigger warnings as metadata. Love this.

(via grrdis)

(via queerandpresentdanger)

55,116 notes

socialjusticekoolaid:

"All I did — what I did was — was release the videotape to you, because I had to," Jackson told reporters on Aug. 15 when asked why he released the robbery footage. "I’d been sitting on it, but I — too many people put in a [Freedom of Information Act] request for that thing, and I had to release that tape to you."

Writing for The Blot, Matthew Keys reports that the police department did not receive any specific requests for the videotape.

"A review of open records requests sent to the Ferguson Police Department found that no news organization, reporter or individual specifically sought the release of the surveillance tape before police distributed it on Aug. 15," Keys writes.

Journalist Andrew Perez also said that he has tried to get the documents to show who sent FOIA requests for the recording.

"I requested all requests for the videotape too, and they produced a ton of docs but no requests for the tape," Perez tweeted.

Perez also tweeted that, when asked, Ferguson Police spokesperson Tim Zoll couldn’t think of any specific requests for the tape.

Your daily reminder the Ferguson Police Department participated in a large-scale conspiracy to slander and demonize Michael Brown, while protecting his murderer, fellow officer Darren Wilson. How and why anyone could still be defending these armed thugsis beyond me. #staywoke #farfromover 

(via noetherian)

4,140 notes

strangeasanjles:

nativeamericannews:

Five-year-old Navajo boy sent home from school for his long hair
A five-year-old boy who is a member of the Navajo Nation was sent home from kindergarten for having long hair.April Wilson said her son, Malachi, was excited for the first day of school on Monday at F.J. Young Elementary in Texas. But he was disappointed when he was told the length of his hair violated school policy. 

Fuck gender roles. Fuck racism. Fuck Texas and fuck anyone who would ruin this beautiful baby’s first day of school.

strangeasanjles:

nativeamericannews:

Five-year-old Navajo boy sent home from school for his long hair

A five-year-old boy who is a member of the Navajo Nation was sent home from kindergarten for having long hair.
April Wilson said her son, Malachi, was excited for the first day of school on Monday at F.J. Young Elementary in Texas. But he was disappointed when he was told the length of his hair violated school policy.


Fuck gender roles. Fuck racism. Fuck Texas and fuck anyone who would ruin this beautiful baby’s first day of school.